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Archive for the ‘places to go’ Category

As a follow-up to my post about Ludwig II of Bavaria, a post about the castles he built.

I think in his time, Ludwig might be seen in the same manner we regard someone like Michael Jackson, and his castles remind of MJ’s Neverland Ranch.

The most impressive castle is Neuschwanstein, which was built by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and as a homage to Richard Wagner.

Herrenchiemsee is the biggest palace, but nor very impressive compared to Ludwig’s fairytale-style castles.

The Linderhof is the smallest castle, and the only of his buildings that Ludwig saw completed.  You can clearly see how it was inspired by Louis XIV’s Versailles, in the shape of the castle.

The Königshaus am Schachen is, as the name says, more a house then a castle. It can only be reached after hours of walking. It was officially meant to be a hunter’s resort, but Ludwig used it to celebrate his birthdays.

Castle Falkenstein is a ruin Ludwig bought in 1883, with the intention to transform it into a fairytale castle. However since he died in 1886, the castle was never completed. This is how it was supposed to look when finished:

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This post is the second part of Byron sources, part one is located here

The other day I attended a theatre show, where the tv program where a dateable girl has to pick one of three bachelors was played. The girl was Richardson’s Pamela, and her choice of men were Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Oscar Wilde (he left early because he was gay.) In the end, Pamela was dragged off stage by Lord Byron, who cackled.

BBC’s Byron
The BBC serie about Byron was by far the most interesting thing I ever saw. If you know BBC series, you know they’re not shy about the, er, less pretty facts of someone’s life, so this serie might not be one you want to show to young children. (Although it’s not very explicit.) The best thing I think is, because it’s so beautiful and interesting, you remember a lot and can appear as a smart person to your peers because you know all kinds of facts about Byron, just by watching a movie. It seems very honest in its representation of Byron’s life.
My only remark would be: show us a little bit more Shelley!

Here are some Byron icons from the BBC series, if you feel Byron should represent you on various messageboards across the net.

You can send your child to Byron Bible Camp. I was very surprised for a minute, until I realised it’s probably named after a different Byron.

You can visit Byron’s home, which is very beautiful.

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The architect that most accurately captures the spirit of the Art Nouveau (or Jugendstil) is, in my opinion, Victor Horta. Horta was born in 1861 in Ghent (Belgium) and started his carreer as a interior designer in Montmartre, Paris. After his father’s death he moved to Brussels, where he graduated at the Academy of Arts and received his first gold medal for his art.
A year after graduating he started his own bureau, entered many contests and networked a lot, which paid off because Horta became a very popular artist. His design for the Hotel Tassel in 1893 is generally seen as the start of the Art Nouveau. He introduced many new concepts in architecture, which are still used today, for example the bel étage and the soutterain.

Due to copyright issues, not a lot of Horta architecture pictures are online (and you can’t take pictures in the museum!) So if you’re ever visiting Brussels, checking out some Horta buildings will be definately worth the effort!

victor horta hotel tassel staircase
The famous staircase in Hotel Tassel

horta tassel hotel entrance
The entrance of the Hotel Tassel

victor horta rue americaine
Rue Americaine

The website of the Horta museum, with lots of info.

The Lifejournal community for Art Nouveau

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